Track Categories

The track category is the heading under which your abstract will be reviewed and later published in the conference printed matters if accepted. During the submission process, you will be asked to select one track category for your abstract.

Adolescent health, or youth health, is the range of approaches to preventing, detecting or treating young people's health and well-being. transitional phase of growth and development between childhood and adulthood.  World Health Organization (WHO) defines an adolescent as any person between ages 10 and 19. Young people's health is often complex and requires a comprehensive, biopsychosocial approach.

  • Track 6-1Puberty
  • Track 6-2Behavioral changes
  • Track 6-3Neurodevelopmental changes
  • Track 6-4Physical changes
  • Track 6-5Psychological changes
  • Track 6-6Social changes
  • Track 6-7Environmental factors
  • Track 6-8Age
  • Track 6-9Youth in Action
  • Track 6-10Adolescent diabetes
  • Track 6-11Sexual behaviour

Adolescence is the gentlest period for a child, as all the psychological and physical changes occur during this age. It is referred to as transitional period in an individual's life. In this session, we will have a talk on physical and hormonal changes like negative attitudes, pressures from peers, drug and alcohol abuse, depression in adolescence, puberty changes, issues of sexuality, impact of substance abuse on child, bullying and aggression, impact of culture on adolescent learning, self-harm and suicidal behaviour, social life of adolescent, adolescent psychosis, adolescent parental relationship.

  • Track 13-1Adolescent mental health issues
  • Track 13-2Adolescent depression
  • Track 13-3Assessment/appraisal
  • Track 13-4Anger management
  • Track 13-5Psychiatric evaluation
  • Track 13-6Child development fundamentals   
  • Track 13-7Enhanced mental health services
  • Track 13-8Bullying
  • Track 13-9Therapy/remedy

one-third of adolescent deaths are suicides triggered by depression. Teenagers may have self-esteem or confidence issues. The feelings of inferiority or superiority often arise from their appearance, and acceptance of their body – skin colour, beauty, and figure. Poor performance in academics and low IQ can also demotivate them. They develop the ‘I’m not good enough’ attitude towards life. Depression is one of the common psychological problems associated with adolescence. The stress and pressure of adolescence can create anxiety related issues, while mood swings can lead to conduct disorder or oppositional defiant disorder. Eating disorders are also psychosomatic as they start with the adolescent having a poor self-image and the need to change the way they look by any means.

  • Track 14-1Chronic illness resources for teens
  • Track 14-2Accident and injuries
  • Track 14-3Behavioural problems
  • Track 14-4Sexual health
  • Track 14-5Infectious disease
  • Track 14-6Nutrition and physical activity
  • Track 14-7Chronic and physical activity
  • Track 14-8Youth homelessness
  • Track 14-9Middle school malaise

Five essential components of adolescent health are mandatory.

Positive connections with supportive people

 > Safe and secure places to live, to learn, and to play

> Access to high-quality, teen-friendly health care

> Opportunities for teens to engage as learners, leaders, team members, and workers

> Coordinated, adolescent- and family-centred services, as needed

  • Track 15-1Child protection
  • Track 15-2General practitioners
  • Track 15-3Youth drug courts
  • Track 15-4Justice health
  • Track 15-5Transition care
  • Track 15-6Implications for policies and programmes
  • Track 15-7Medication monitoring
  • Track 15-8Teen pregnancy prevention
  • Track 15-9Parenting resources

Adolescence and puberty are not the same.

Adolescence is that ten to twelve-year period of social and psychological growth that transforms the dependent child into a functionally independent young adult in his or her early to mid-twenties.

Puberty is the one to three-year process of hormonal and physical change that causes the young person to reach sexual maturity, girls usually entering it about a year earlier than boys.

Among other changes wrought by puberty, there are growth spurts that create bigger bodies to manage. For girl’s hips broaden, breasts swell, menstruation begins, and they can produce eggs. For boy’s muscles expand, voice drops, ejaculation begins, and they can produce sperm. For both male and female there is more hair around sex organs, more body odour, and more active skin glands that can create acne.Adolescence and puberty are not the same.

Adolescence is that ten to twelve-year period of social and psychological growth that transforms the dependent child into a functionally independent young adult in his or her early to mid-twenties.

Puberty is the one to three-year process of hormonal and physical change that causes the young person to reach sexual maturity, girls usually entering it about a year earlier than boys.

Among other changes wrought by puberty, there are growth spurts that create bigger bodies to manage. For girl’s hips broaden, breasts swell, menstruation begins, and they can produce eggs. For boy’s muscles expand, voice drops, ejaculation begins, and they can produce sperm. For both male and female there is more hair around sex organs, more body odour, and more active skin glands that can create acne.

  • Track 16-1Problems of puberty
  • Track 16-2Genetial and public devolopment

 Adolescent sexuality is a stage of human development in which teenagers’ involvement and discover sexual feelings. Interest in sexuality strengthens during the onset of puberty, and sexuality is often a vital aspect of teenagers' lives. n humans, sexual interest may be expressed in a number of ways, such as flirting, kissing, masturbation, or having sex with a partner. Sexual interest among adolescents, as among adults, can vary greatly, and is influenced by cultural norms and mores, sex education provided, sexual orientation, and social controls such as age of consent laws.

 Numerous risk behaviours, such as smoking, anti-social behaviour, hazardous alcohol consumption and insecure sexual intercourse, cluster in adolescence and are associated with increased risk of poor educational attainment, upcoming injury and untimely mortality.These behaviours go beyond pure ‘risk-taking’ behaviours and encirclement behaviours which are omnipresent in society, such as low levels of physical activity. These behaviours shape adult behaviour and the significances are costly to society and young people.

  • Track 18-1Previous delinquency
  • Track 18-2Substance abuse
  • Track 18-3Teen pregnancy/Unintended pregnancy
  • Track 18-4Different developmental trajectory
  • Track 18-5Study reflected contextual 
  • Track 18-6premature mortality
  • Track 18-7Short-term health effects of physical activity
  • Track 18-8Alcohol use

Girls are far more likely to have eating sicknesses. However, boys are also vulnerable. eating in secret, obsession with food, calorie counting, fear of becoming fat, binge eating, abolition, food phobias or avoidance.  The most common eating disorders among adolescents are anorexia, bulimia and binge-eating disorder. Teenagers with anorexia may take risky procedures to avoid eating and control the amount and eminence of the nutrients they do eat. Teenagers with bulimia nervosa typically ‘binge and purge’ by appealing in uncontrollable episodes of overindulging usually followed by compensatory behaviour such as: purging through vomiting, use of laxatives, enemas, fasting, or excessive workout

  • Track 19-1Obesity
  • Track 19-2Anorexia nervosa
  • Track 19-3Thyroid problems 
  • Track 19-4Binge eating disorder
  • Track 19-5Bulimia nervosa
  • Track 19-6Self-induced vomiting
  • Track 19-7Misusing laxatives or diurectics
  • Track 19-8Fasting or chronic restrained eating
  • Track 20-1Adolescent psychiatry
  • Track 20-2Adolescent gynocology
  • Track 20-3Pediatric psychiatry
  • Track 20-4Dermatologist
  • Track 20-5Adolescent medicine specialist
  • Track 20-6Gynecologist
  • Track 20-7Gastroenterologist
  • Track 20-8Sleep disorders specialist
  • Track 20-9Pediatricians
  • Track 20-10Developmental behavioral pediatricians
  • Track 20-11Child psychiatrists
  • Track 20-12Pediatric psychopharmacologists
  • Track 20-13Pediatric neurologists
  • Track 20-14Pediatric psychiatric nurse practitioners

 A near replication in the extent of the testicles and the scrotal sac proclaims the advent of puberty. Fuelled by testosterone, the next changes of puberty come in quick succession. A few light-coloured downy hairs emerge at the base of the penis. A boy may have adult-size genitals as early as age thirteen or as late as eighteen. A child may deliberately masturbate himself to his first ejaculation.

  • Track 21-1Enlargement of the testicles
  • Track 21-2Penis enlargement
  • Track 21-3Appearance of pubic hair
  • Track 21-4Nocturnal emissions
  • Track 21-5Hair under the arms and on the face
  • Track 21-6Voice change
  • Track 21-7Acne

The initial noticeable sign of puberty in girls is a nickel-sized swelling under one or both nipples. the subsequent sign of puberty is the presence of pubic hair in the pubic area. Preteenager females attain what, in mutual language, is often called “baby fat,” which may give them a more rounded belly; this development may cause significant anxiety for these girls. when the breasts start to develop, prefiguring the arrival of puberty one and a half to three years pass before the first menstrual periods.

  • Track 22-1Breast development
  • Track 22-2Pubic hair development
  • Track 22-3Menstrual periods
  • Track 22-4Develops the ability to think abstractly
  • Track 22-5Wants independence from parents
  • Track 22-6Changes body shape

 The mind and body are closely connected, and stress can affect the body from head to toe. And in fact, the survey found teens experience both emotional and physical symptoms of stress. Common symptoms include feeling nervous or anxious, feeling tired, procrastinating or neglecting everyday jobs, feeling overcome, having adverse thoughts and experiencing changes in sleeping habits. Problems with concentrating and changes in eating habits (eating too much or too little) are also linked to stress. Physical activity is one of the most effective stress busters.

The reasons behind a teen's suicide or attempted suicide can be complex. Although suicide is relatively rare among children, the rate of suicides and suicide attempts increases greatly during adolescence. Suicide is the third-leading cause of death for 15- to 24-year-olds. It's also thought that at least 25 attempts are made for every completed teen suicide. Mental Illness as a Cause of Teen Suicide. Situations often drive the emotional causes of suicide. Bullying, cyberbullying, abuse, a detrimental home life, loss of a loved one or even a severe breakup can by contributing causes of teen suicide. Often, many of these ecological factors occur together to reason suicidal feelings and behaviours.